IMEKO Event Proceedings

Page 847 of 866 Results 8461 - 8470 of 8655

Roger C Baker , Pamela I Moore, Alun Thomas
Verification for Electromagnetic Flowmeters: Its current state and its potential

The validity of the claims made for currently available verification devices are reviewed. The theoretical requirements to achieve the verification measurements are suggested and the validity of the approach assessed accordingly. Likely achievable uncertainties are considered. There is a brief discussion of the administration of the verification procedure by users. Successful verification strategies will be dependent on the quality of the manufactured product and the necessary good housekeeping within the manufacturing company. The authors conclude by suggesting that the current concept is promising but may need to be developed if it is to yield a generally acceptable approach.

Jeong-Tae Lee, Dong-Ki Kim, Ik-Soo Jeong
VERIFICATION OF EFFECTS UPON THE SHORT-DISTANCE-DASH-START THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED PRECISION SENSOR IN THE STARTING BLOCKS

This study intends to develop a more improved starting block precision sensor for the enhancement of performance and for a kinematic analysis of the short-distance-dash. The production is equipped with a strain gauge attached to the symmetric beam structure for the existing starting block currently on the market. It is found to show that equipment has 5 times more improved effects, indicating that the beam structure devised in this study is effective, and that reliable results can be achieved. In the future, an additional research will be conducted on the impact of training track athletes with this starting block sensor upon correcting their starting positions and improving records in the short-distance-dash.

Michael Bair
Verification of Gas Flow Traceability From 0.1 SCCM To 1 SCCM Using a Piston Gauge

Fluke Calibration is accredited for gas flow measurements in the range of 0.1 sccm to 6000 slm in nitrogen and air. Traceability is maintained directly through a gravimetric flow standard but only recently from 1 to 10 sccm. The traceability of flow in the range of 0.1 to 1 sccm is based on extrapolation of the use of laminar flow elements below 1 sccm. This part of the range has never been completely verified through interlaboratory comparisons, proficiency testing or other means of measurement assurance. In an internal document from DH Instruments in the early 1990s it was suggested that a piston gauge could be used to gain traceability for very lows gas flows. In order to prove out traceability in this range an attempt was made to use a piston gauge using a piston-cylinder size of 35 mm diameter as a reference.
One of the reasons for choosing a piston gauge as a reference is its ability to control pressure. This is crucial when measuring gas flow through a laminar flow element (LFE) in this design and range. In addition, the effective area is known to within 0.001% leaving the vertical displacement of the piston to dominate the uncertainty of the dimensional part of the flow test. This was a challenge because the measurements needed to be made in absolute mode and the internal piston position sensor supplied with the piston gauge did not have sufficient precision. This paper describes the theory and design of the gas flow measurement system, the current results, and improvements needed or suggested. Two different designs are discussed, one with a single piston gauge as a reference and the possibility of two piston gauges measuring flow on either side of the laminar flow element.
Note: sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute) is an industry accepted alternative to kg/s [1]. It is used out of convenience to normalize flow rates of gases with significant differences in density.

Robert Ellis, Andy Knott, Konrad Herrmann
VERIFICATION OF IMAGE ANALYSIS SYSTEMS FOR MEASURING BRINELL INDENTATIONS

Recently image analysis systems have become available and are now used widely in industry. While there are great benefits in using this method to measure Brinell hardness indentations, a method to verify these systems is needed. Older methods using flat stage micrometers exclusively are not sufficient. Methods and guidelines for the use of these systems should be developed.

Jörg Gebhardt, Guruprased Sosale, Patric Ackermann
VERIFICATION OF INDUSTRIAL TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS USING A NON-INVASIVE APPROACH

Non-invasive temperature measurements are described as a means for verifi cation of standard invasive temperature sensors in the process industry. The work is motivated by the need for more controlled measurement quality in digitalization of process industries. The concept, relevant measurements and a verifi cation example are pre- sented, with a discussion of the implications.

Édilla M. Gonçalves Fernandes, Henrique C. de Campos Glória, Davies W. de Lima Monteiro, Luiz F. Etrusco Moreira
VERIFICATION OF LIGHT-SOURCE UNIFORMITY IN A PORTABLE SETUP FOR DIGITAL CAMERA CHARACTERIZATION

This work presents a flexible, low-cost and portable setup that allows the characterization of digital cameras based on the EMVA 1288 standard. Instead of using expensive equipment as an integrating sphere, we propose a properly evaluated simple light source based on a translucent glass surface. To make this possible it is necessary to understand the uniformity aspects of this surface and to map its interference by means of a characterization procedure. The method proposed basically subtracts the non- uniformity map of the original light source allowing its use as a flat field surface.
An optical setup was developed to extract data for the uniformity verification. It is basically composed by a digital camera, a frosted-surface light source, an extension tube and a translation stage. Some preliminary results are presented showing the validity of this approach.

Potočnik, D., Nečemer, M., Jagodic, M., Mazej, D., Ogrinc, N.
Verification of milk on the Slovenian market based on stable isotope and elemental analysis

Compliance with legal and labelling requirements, determination of nutrient values and detection of adulteration are some of the main reasons for the development and application of methods and techniques in food science. In this presentation, stable isotope ratios of light elements (13C/12C, 15N/14N, 18O/16O, 34S/32S) and elemental composition were used to verify the correct assignment of Slovenian milk samples and to develop a discrimination model able to discriminate between milk of Europe and Slovene origin.
The first database of authentic Slovenian cow milk has now been established and includes isotopic composition of oxygen (δ18O) in milk, the isotopic composition of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur in casein (δ13C, δ15N and δ34S) and the elemental composition of raw milk. Samples were collected in summer and winter during 2012, 2013 and 2014 from different geographical regions (Alpine, Dinaric, Pannonian, Mediterranean) in Slovenia.
By applying Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to the data set of authentic Slovenian samples in 2013 and 2014, it was possible to differentiate Slovenian milk from milk produced in other EU countries (Austria, Croatia, Germany, Italy). The most important parameters that contributed to F1 distinctiveness were δ18O, Sr, K, Ca, while F2 was characterized by δ13C in casein, Zn, Br and δ18O. Furthermore, eleven milk samples, labelled as “Slovenian milk” were confirmed and classified as being authentic Slovenian milk. Results indicated that LDA classification could effectively contribute towards distinguishing milk samples of different geographical origin and provide a useful tool for the inspection and verification of declaration of origin. Information available through our study could be used to increase the transparency of the milk and dairy products supply chain.
This research represents a part of the ERA Chair ISO-FOOD for isotope techniques in food quality, safety and traceability.

Krzysztof STEPIEN
VERIFICATION OF THE CONCEPT OF SPHERICITY MEASUREMENTS BY THE RADIAL METHOD UNDER INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS

At the Kielce University of Technology a new concept of accurate measurements of sphericity deviations of machine parts has been developed. The concept is based upon measurement of roundness profiles in many clearly defined cross-sections of the workpiece. Measurements are performed with the use of typical radial measuring instrument equipped with a unit allowing accurate positioning of the ball. The paper presents results of the verification of the developed concept under industrial conditions.

Paulo R. G. Couto, Luiz Henrique Paraguassu, Leonardo Rodrigues Cinelli, Ilca Lopes.Bezerra, Isabela Wanderley Alves, Walmir Sérgio da Silva
VERIFICATION OF THE CONVERGENCE BETWEEN ISO GUM 95 vs MONTE CARLO METHOD REGARDING THE EXPANDAD UNCERTAINTY AT THE PRESSURE LABORATORY IN BRAZIL

This paper describes the way by which the National Pressure Laboratory in Brazil has been calculating its calibration measurement capabilities (CMC) using the uncertainty estimations contained in the ISO GUM 95 and declared in the appendix C of the BIPM, and verifying if there is any convergence and consistency between the measurements results calculate with both methods.

Zdenek Havranek, Ludvik Bejcek
VERIFICATION OF THE DOUBLE LAYER HOLOGRAPHIC ARRAY FOR EXTRACTION OF SOUND FIELDS IN REVERBERANT CONDITIONS

This paper describes methods and presents verification results of improvement of algorithms for visualization of sound fields based on near-field acoustical holography (NAH) by the double layer holografic array (DLA) measurement and iterative technique to remove disturbing sound fields which are not in the examinated area under measurement planes (holograms).

Page 847 of 866 Results 8461 - 8470 of 8655